Blind Spots Why We Fail to Do What s Right and What to Do about It When confronted with an ethical dilemma most of us like to think we would stand up for our principles But we are not as ethical as we think we are In Blind Spots leading business ethicists Max Bazer

  • Title: Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right and What to Do about It
  • Author: Max H. Bazerman Ann E. Tenbrunsel
  • ISBN: 9780691147505
  • Page: 419
  • Format: Hardcover
  • When confronted with an ethical dilemma, most of us like to think we would stand up for our principles But we are not as ethical as we think we are In Blind Spots, leading business ethicists Max Bazerman and Ann Tenbrunsel examine the ways we overestimate our ability to do what is right and how we act unethically without meaning to From the collapse of Enron and corruptWhen confronted with an ethical dilemma, most of us like to think we would stand up for our principles But we are not as ethical as we think we are In Blind Spots, leading business ethicists Max Bazerman and Ann Tenbrunsel examine the ways we overestimate our ability to do what is right and how we act unethically without meaning to From the collapse of Enron and corruption in the tobacco industry, to sales of the defective Ford Pinto, the downfall of Bernard Madoff, and the Challenger space shuttle disaster, the authors investigate the nature of ethical failures in the business world and beyond, and illustrate how we can become ethical, bridging the gap between who we are and who we want to be.Explaining why traditional approaches to ethics don t work, the book considers how blind spots like ethical fading the removal of ethics from the decision making process have led to tragedies and scandals such as the Challenger space shuttle disaster, steroid use in Major League Baseball, the crash in the financial markets, and the energy crisis The authors demonstrate how ethical standards shift, how we neglect to notice and act on the unethical behavior of others, and how compliance initiatives can actually promote unethical behavior They argue that scandals will continue to emerge unless such approaches take into account the psychology of individuals faced with ethical dilemmas Distinguishing our should self the person who knows what is correct from our want self the person who ends up making decisions , the authors point out ethical sinkholes that create questionable actions.Suggesting innovative individual and group tactics for improving human judgment, Blind Spots shows us how to secure a place for ethics in our workplaces, institutions, and daily lives.

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      Published :2018-08-03T04:14:09+00:00

    One thought on “Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right and What to Do about It”

    1. This is a great book about how people are much more unethical than they think they are. I'm an auditor, so thinking about what motivates people to act in less desirable ways is part of my job. The point of the book is that we tend to focus on corruption that is deliberate and intentional, but ignore unethical choices made everday that are unintentional, when we are confused by our ethical blind spots. The authors analyze major recent ethical lapses through this lens, such as Enron, steroids in b [...]

    2. Not the most scintillating writing, but a clear and compelling book about how our psychological tendencies make it almost impossible for us to behave as ethically as we want to, or as ethically as we think we do. The authors -- a Harvard prof and a Notre Dame prof -- also show how these very human flaws affect corporate ethics and societal ethics.At the end of the book, they mention two ways that governments could immediately obtain more ethical decisions. One is the Sunstein-Thaler "Nudge" appr [...]

    3. The book provides some good and thought provoking insight into why people tend to make bad unethical decisions. Though I found it a bit dry at times, it was still well worth the investment of my time. There is also an abbreviated version published by Harvard Business Review. I highly recommend for anyone in business and anyone in a leadership position.

    4. This is a great book about how people are much more unethical than they think they are. I'm an auditor, so thinking about what motivates people to act in less desirable ways is part of my job. The point of the book is that we tend to focus on corruption that is deliberate and intentional, but ignore unethical choices made everday that are unintentional, when we are confused by our ethical blind spots. The authors analyze major recent ethical lapses through this lens, such as Enron, steroids in b [...]

    5. I read this book because I'm developing an ethics course at work. The main thesis behind the book is that people make poor ethical choices not because they're bad people but because they are blind to the factors that shortcut their decisions. For example, last month's kerfuffle involving the authors who were unwilling to change/delete the gay character from their MG sci-fi series. During the melee, there was a lot of focus and back and forth on the agency and whether or not the agency/agent were [...]

    6. "In the prediction phase, we may clearly see the ethical aspect of a given decision. Our moral values are evoked, and we believe we will behave according to those values. models of ethical decision making derived by philosophers, in fact, often predict that moral awareness will prompt moral behavior. However, at the time of the decision, ethical fading occurs, and we no longer see the ethical dimension of a decision. Ethical principles don’t appear to be relevant, so they don’t enter into ou [...]

    7. Fascinating findings and implications but a bit of a dry read. This book explores how people believe they are more ethical than they really are and that they believe others are less ethical than they may be. It looks at these issues mostly in a business setting and examines studies and findings on what does not work and what does. Interestingly, instituting rewards or punishment for a single goal is not effective. People either focus so much on the reward they neglect other good things or they l [...]

    8. An excellent discussion of ethics and the dangers inherent in "bounded ethics," focusing only on certain decisions as involving ethics while neglecting the ethical import of other decisions and/or the unethical actions done without conscious awareness or consideration of their unethical nature. The authors do well at explaining these concepts and connecting them to recent events and studies on individual, corporate, cultural, and political levels. They also suggest possible solutions for these g [...]

    9. This book had a lot of really good ideas, and helped me refine my thinking about ethical decision making. I think the key idea--that most ethical lapses are not intentional--is really key to understanding ethical challenges. The shortcoming of this book, as the authors openly admit, is that there is not much in the way of advice for staying on track. Nevertheless, this offers a helpful framework for thinking about ethical lapses.

    10. This book contains some important considerations that are often overlooked in the average ethics book. Others concentrate on what is right or wrong, what one should or should not do. This one addresses why we make choices that violate the ethics we espouse. It is interesting to realize many people fail to even recognize the ethical nature of the choices they face and make the choice based on other criteria. I recommend it for anyone looking into a more practical side of ethics.

    11. There's a lot of good stuff in this that helps us understand how the mind works in relationship to ethics. Explanations for why we're not as ethical as we think we are, about the slippery slope of ethics, and why so many well-intentioned government programs achieve exactly the opposite result than is wanted. A worthwhile read.

    12. Being ethical in banking is a lot harder than we think. There is always a gap between how ethical we think we are and who we actually are. We do bad things sometimes without being aware that we are doing anything wrong.

    13. This book isn't full of aha moments or anything but it's a book I think everyone should read. We all have blind spots but if you don't know what they are you'll never be able to see yours. It did a good job describing blind spots and gave good advice on how to deal with your own blind spots.

    14. Eye OpeningHelped me see some of my own blind spots and the power of "want" versus "should" in my choices. Everyone aspiring to management positions can benefit by understanding the importance between what they say and what they do on the ethical culture of their work group.

    15. I thoroughly enjoyed this. Bazerman creates a good argument that we, as people, unconsciously create walls around parts of our life so that we can make decisions we need not regard as ethical or unethical - no matter how closely related they are to our values and ethics.

    16. Why do "good" people make lousy ethical decisions -- yes JoePa, I'm referring to YOU! Behavioral Ethics -- an exciting, emerging field described in this book -- provides meaningful and actionable insight to the ethical challenges that face us all.

    17. Summary of decades of research. Interesting, but if you're vaguely familiar with the field you've probably read most things here elsewhere

    18. Blind Spots gives a good summary of the behavioral work on morality and motivated reasoning (such as hypocrisy and our blindness to our own hypocrisy), and attempts to use this research to explain many topical issues in current events (like the Madoff scandal), and suggests ways to improve the reader and societies ethical behavior (like being aware of said biases). However, this book makes a few grave logical errors (albeit errors that are endemic to this behavioral literature, not unique to Baz [...]

    19. mi s-a parut ca se repeta ideile si ca nu inveti neaparat ceva din carte. inafara de faptul ca trebuie mereu sa alegem Should (etic) si nu want, indiferent de situatie si sa ne gandim la viitor nu la o perioada apropiata

    20. The authors take a scientific view into why we do not do what is right even though we know it is right. Its a honest and cuts straight to the heart of the many different ethical dilemmas and what we should do about them. The central theme of the book revolves around the idea of bounded awareness, a phenomenon where we segment the different decisions that we make in our lives into ethical and non-ethical (business) decisions, coming to different decisions based on the way we view these decisions. [...]

    21. Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right and What to Do about It (Hardcover) by Max H. Bazermanfrom the libraryCh 4 p63 footnote 3//J A Woodzicka and M LaFrance (2001), "real versus Imagined Gender Harassment," J of Social Issues 57(1): 15-30Interview experimental questions: Do you have a boyfriend? Do people find you desirable? Do you think it is appropriate for women to wear bras to work?Contents: 1. The gap between intended and actual ethical behavior -- 2. Why traditional approaches to et [...]

    22. I wish I could give this 3.5 stars, because it's not really a four star book. From the engagement perspective, it was quick and enjoyable. It starts out as a promising delve into behavior ethics, offering psychological insights into why standard models of 'ethics training' seem to have little impact in our workplaces, universities, and in society at large. The book addresses our 'want' impulses vs. 'should' reflections. Yet I was hoping for more than a collection of anecdotal policy-changing sug [...]

    23. An interesting book and I could pick out mm own failings and of course those in the illustrations. I was discouraged by it. So many of those in business,politics, church etc make decisions that are unethical and deflect the blame. As the book said, with self interest there is bias - and many times those in charge have more loyalty to the (Church, business etc) which greatly influences how ethical their decisions are.

    24. Very insightful book that offers good perspectives for those that are open-minded. The examples they use are usually well-known and can be verified through external sources. My only complaint is the editing seemed to fall apart just slightly towards the latter half. However that doesn't take away from the fact that this was a very good book.

    25. A book that starts off very promisingly but ultimately leaves you wanting more. The topics discussed on this book are important and worth reading. If nothing else, this book will result in a new appreciation of the ethical blindspots that we all suffer from.

    26. Some great identification of the ethical blind spots and how easily it can happen even unintentionally.I wish the book was able to provide more practical examples on how to combat this blind spot, that is more than self awareness.

    27. Good points, but when the first page of the first chapter has a logic error, then I questiong the rigor with which one prepared the book.

    28. Business ethics from a fresh perspektive! Really enlightening. You will love this kind of moral stuff.

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