Toys Come Home Being the Early Experiences of an Intelligent Stingray a Brave Buffalo and a Brand New Someone Called Plastic Here is the third book in the highly acclaimed Toys Trilogy which includes the companion books Toys Go Out and Toy Dance Party A timeless story of adventure and friendship to treasure aloud or indepe

  • Title: Toys Come Home: Being the Early Experiences of an Intelligent Stingray, a Brave Buffalo, and a Brand-New Someone Called Plastic
  • Author: Emily Jenkins Paul O. Zelinsky
  • ISBN: 9780375862007
  • Page: 351
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Here is the third book in the highly acclaimed Toys Trilogy, which includes the companion books Toys Go Out and Toy Dance Party A timeless story of adventure and friendship to treasure aloud or independently, raved Booklist in a starred review Fans of the series, as well as newcomers, will happily discover how Lumphy, StingRay, and Plastic came to live with the Girl.Here is the third book in the highly acclaimed Toys Trilogy, which includes the companion books Toys Go Out and Toy Dance Party A timeless story of adventure and friendship to treasure aloud or independently, raved Booklist in a starred review Fans of the series, as well as newcomers, will happily discover how Lumphy, StingRay, and Plastic came to live with the Girl In six linked adventures, readers will also learn how the one eared Sheep became one eared watch a cranky toy meet an unfortunate end and best of all, learn why it s okay for someone you truly love to puke on you Here is perhaps the most charming of three inimitably charming books destined to become classics.Book Details Format HardcoverPublication Date 9 13 2011Pages 144Reading Level Age 6 and Up

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    One thought on “Toys Come Home: Being the Early Experiences of an Intelligent Stingray, a Brave Buffalo, and a Brand-New Someone Called Plastic”

    1. This is a prequel to the other Toys books, giving us the origin stories for Stingray, Lumphy, and Plastic and the simple goals and problems of the toys reflect the constrained concerns of young children.I love them. Cute, and importantly, amusing stories, that continue to delight me long after my own kids have stopped pretending their stuffed animals were real. Stories parents could repeatedly read to their children without wanting to kill anyone. Highly recommended.Library copy.

    2. Liked this one better than Toy Dance Party, but maybe not as much as Toys Go Out. Too much puke/vomit.

    3. I'm feeling tetchy. Let's set out some rules when it comes to prequels of children's books then. Number One: You are allowed to write a prequel if you wrote the original book in the first place. Um . . . . okay, that's all I can think of off the top of my head. But it's a good rule in general, don't you think? Follow that rule and you won't have to deal with seeing Anne before she came to Green Gables or speculate as to how Captain Hook got to be so mean. Not that every author should consider wr [...]

    4. Toys Come Home by Emily Jenkins, published 2011Genre: FictionFormat: Hardback PrintPlot: This books introduces the reader to the toy Stingray and chronicles her adventures as she plays with the other toys. She learns the dangers of a child being sick, learns how to help frinds who get stuck in bushes, finds out how to stop a kitten from attacking, and learns how to make new friends when other toys come into the room to live. The book also deals with some existential questions when Stingray and s [...]

    5. Chronologically, this book comes first and tells how Stingray, Lumphy and Plastic come to belong to the girl. But I think the series can be enjoyed in any orderd Emily Jenkins suggests reading it in the order it was written. The stingray sometimes wears on me just the tiniest bitbut maybe I am/was a bit like Stingray, wanting to show off my knowledge. But overall, they are such believable and fun characters. If I taught 1st grade or probably even 2nd grade, I would definitely read these aloud to [...]

    6. I absolutely loved Toys Go Out and was really looking forwad to Toys Come Home. I started out really liking it, but thought it fell a little flat aout half way through. Some small children might think it is a little disturbing how one of the toys gets destroyed in the dryer. The book also raises some big questions like "why are we here" that I don't know will resonate with small children. It's a nice book, but not the special book I was hoping for. It didn't make me feel as warm and cuddly as th [...]

    7. Alternate title: Toys With Existential Angst. I do like this one lots better than the second one, but it's not as brilliant as the first. Learning about where all the toys came from was a lot of fun. I should have guessed that Sheep was an heirloom. I thought Lumphy was a little whiny here, but maybe it was his inexperience that made him so. Which is to say, why yes, I do believe I'm invested in these characters.

    8. I can't say enough good things about these books - the kids love them, I love them. There are many words and phrases from these books that have made their way into our daily life. When something needs to be washed we say it needs to "go visit Frank" and when Aoife is being a little too imperious with her brothers we say she is a "bossyboots" just like stingray. And we love to quote Plastic "Beach! Beach! Beach!"

    9. My favorite toys start their adventure in this prequel! The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is because I thought there were a few times the author may have forgotten she was writing for children ("axe murderers" ?? omg) that I personally found slightly distracted from the otherwise sweetness & innocence that I love about this series. Otherwise, it was a joy to not only read about where our old friends Stingray, Lumphy & Plastic came from, but also why they came. Loved! <3

    10. We liked hearing the story of how the toys came to live with the girl. Bea loved the kitten that said Mngew and the humor of the book. Neither one of us liked the continued use of puking and nausea as a plot device. Ugh. Really, who likes to read about that. Puking on a favorite stuffed animal and then having it ruined in the wash? That is pretty darn traumatic stuff. It bothered my sensitive girl a lot.

    11. Emily Jenkins does an amazing job of reaching children where they are. The toys do the talking, but you just know that little kids have some of the same thoughts and ideas that Lumphy and StingRay have.

    12. My kids and I have loved this entire series. Highly recommended for read-alouds. I especially enjoy the onomatopoeia the author uses to create different sounds the toys experience.

    13. I liked this one. It was fun to see how Lumphy, Plastic, and StingRay came to be with the little girl. I was sad about Bobby Dot, though. :(

    14. This is the first chapter book that I read aloud to my four-year old at bedtime. It was perfect for the occasion. It involved characters that a child could relate to - namely toys. The writing was simple but funny with some things implied. The implications sparked some interesting conversations. The plot was interesting but not so exciting as to keep a tired kid awake and definitely not too upsetting. I didn't find anything questionable about the characters actions. Overall, this was a perfect f [...]

    15. Fiona enjoyed all of these books, but was confused by the third book in the series taking place chronologically before the other two. She kept asking about characters that weren't part of the story yet. Overall this series is a good introduction to chapter books for kids, with no really scary or sad events and pictures at least once every chapter. I think it has also inspired her to use more imagination interacting with her own toys.

    16. Toys Come Home is actually a prequel to Toys Go Out and Toy Dance Party, but I have never read either of those, so I’m really reviewing this book in isolation. This story is mainly about a toy stingray and how she comes to be in the possession of a little girl who also owns several other toys. It is also - among other things - about what happens when a toy is lost, how a sheep who apparently figures heavily into the other two books loses an ear, the cliqueishness of the towels living in the li [...]

    17. Toys Come Home: Being the Early Experiences of an Intelligent Stingray, a Brave Buffalo, and a Brand-New Someone Called Plastic (Toys Go Out) by Emily Jenkins, illustrated by Paul Zelinsky is the prequel to the popular Toys Go Out series in which we learn how the three toys first came to live with The Girl.There are six linked adventures, each a chapter. StingRay arrives and we see her introduction to many other toys. We learn how Sheep loses an ear. What happened to Bobby Dot is explained. Lump [...]

    18. Toys Come Home is the third companion book written by Emily Jenkins and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky. It describes the adventures of some very delightful toys. There's no need to read the first two to enjoy this one. The books are well designed with a font size just right for new readers and occasional full-page illustrations. Each book is smaller than a picture book but somewhat larger than a regular chapter book or new reader. The illustrations capture the toys’ personalities perfectly. T [...]

    19. This is the third book in the Toys series and is a prequel to Toys Go Out. This one also tells a more consistent story. The book starts with StingRay arriving at the Little Girl's home for her birthday. StingRay also meets some of the Girl's other toys, such as Sheep, who is old and falls asleep easily, and Bobby Dot, a stuffed walrus who is incredibly arrogant and no one likes. Originally feeling unloved, StingRay tries to run away, but is soon found and realizes she's wanted. Later on, Bobby D [...]

    20. I love these books about the adventures of a girl's toys. This is a prequel to the other two, beginning when StingRay enters the family as a birthday present. Jenkins writes with such good humor and honesty; these books are funny, true to a kid’s experiences of life, and deeply moving all at the same time. I constantly recommend these books as read-alouds for families with kids of different agesl ages will get something from her writing, including adults! I also love how her author’s note ex [...]

    21. What toys do when your back is turned is an age-old question asked by children. Author Emily Jenkins invites readers to view their playthings from the toys' vantage. A companion to Toys Go Out and Toy Dance Party, Toys Come Home is the beginning of StingRay's story from the day she is given as a day-of-birth gift. Her quest to find friends, save other toys, and learn why toys exist will delight young readers. Each chapter stands alone as a short story, and is accompanied by a detailed pencil ill [...]

    22. This little book, possibly the sweetest and most beautiful I have read, is the inspiration for the new "just-thank-you" shelf, wherein the antidotes to toxic authors shall be given their just commemorations. I actually "loved" and not just "really liked" it, but I'm working with the rating system here. I would almost go so far as to say it was "amazing," but really, what it simply makes the most sense to say is that I loved this book (which, in lesser hands, could so easily have been insufferab [...]

    23. This was a very good prequel in the toys go out series. In it we get to read about stingray, lumphy, and plastic and heart about how they all became friends and their first adventures together. Stories about what toys do when we aren't looking are fun and these stories are too. Stingray claims to know everything and her explanations can be quote amusing. Our favorite was her explanation of bowling Everyone gets ginger ale but instead of drinking from cups everyone drinks from bowls. The characte [...]

    24. This is the prequel to Toys Go Out, in which we discover how StingRay, Lumphy and Plastic came to belong to the Girl. These books are absolutely delightful and I especially enjoyed this newest title. I can imagine children being enchanted by these books and also that these would be wonderful read-alouds. I laughed out loud a number of times and just felt so happy and content the whole time I was reading. I wanted it to go on forever. Zelinsky's illustrations are the perfect accompaniment to Jenk [...]

    25. More adventures with the Girl's toys: Stingray, Sheep, the mice, Bobby Dot the walrus, plus Lumphy and Plastic.My kids weren't as into this one as I thought they'd be. They liked it, don't get me wrong, but the parts I thought they would find hilarious--the whole puke episode, for instance--were good for a few smiles, maybe a little laugh, then they moved on. I really like the simple narratives, as well as the distinct personalities of the toys. My son found another one at the library last week, [...]

    26. While I really love the language of this book, and the others in the sort-of-series, I found parts of it really uncomfortable to read to my children. Perhaps this is intended for an older audience than my preschool (4) and kindergarten (5) aged children, but some of the deep concepts addressed in this otherwise lighthearted story were just too much. And sudden death of a character was a bit extreme, in my opinion. But, I really did like the overall story, and the use of interesting vocabulary an [...]

    27. I read the first Toys Go Out back in before I had ever heard of Toy Story. A teacher friend used to do a toy unit every December and this would make a great read aloud for that time of year (first to third grade)I love the language. Who couldn't love "A mischief of toy mice, very small in size, run across the floor to the toy boy". Lots of opportunity to use this as a writing mentor text for older kids.If you want to read a great review of this read Elizabeth Bird's. I certainly can't do any bet [...]

    28. Jeepers! Truly, can anything be better than a story with lovingly drawn characters (not just figuratively - Zelinsky's illustrations are pretty darn good), hair-raising adventure, pathos, humor, Big Philosophical Questions, AND a 3rd-grade reading level? I think not. Highly recommended, as are the other two books in this trilogy, for all ages ('cause it makes a great read-aloud for younger kids as well).

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